Have your say: strata discussion paper

| September 18, 2012

First 5000 members are invited to have your say on NSW strata and community title laws following the release of discussion paper Making NSW No. 1 Again: Shaping Future Communities released on 15 September 2012.

Submissions close: Thursday, 15 November 2012.

<--break->” src=”http://staging.first5000.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/spacer.gif” title=”<--break-->“><br />Many of you contributed to the <a href=Strata Laws Online Consultation hosted by First 5000 parent company Global Access Partners on the Open Forum website from December 2011 to February 2012.

The Government’s discussion paper is the next stage in the review and builds on the comments made to the online forum. The paper looks at a wide range of topics, including the future regulatory approach, how to improve the running of schemes, managing finances, managing buildings and handling disputes.

You can download the discussion paper here. Click on the link under ‘Have Your Say’ to get to the review page.

The NSW Government will be carefully consider all submissions made as part of its strata and community title law reform process.

Information on how to submit comments can be found inside front page of the discussion paper.

The Fair Trading website also has a quick survey you can complete.

 

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Helen Hull

Helen Hull is the editor of First 5000, the leading network for mid-sized businesses in Australia.

One Comment

  1. Peter Roberts

    September 26, 2012 at 1:55 am

    When I lived in Singapore I
    When I lived in Singapore I observed the successful scheme they have ‘m-blocking;’ whereby a large % of strata owners could vote to have their entire building re-developed, even if a small number of owners did not want to sell…I thought it a positive as it brought about renewal of aged housing stock. But in Australia I agree that there need to be protections for residents from aggressive developers who target blocks for demolition…it should be done on the genuine wish of the majority of owners, not the whims of one developer.
    What do others say?